TwoBrothersSurf.com Nicaragua Surf Blog

Nicaragua Surfing and Travel

Browsing Posts tagged Guasacate

I don’t really send mail in Nicaragua – the post office is this great corner building in RIVAS – an old colonial building with the entrance sliced diagonally across the corner closest to the street, exposing the two foot thick adobe mud walls.  Inside its dark and cool with just a small glass case of colorful stamps bearing the images of Nicaraguan birds, and insects and fauna and a dark, worn, wooden counter flanked by numbered post boxes.  Our number was 28, the key was on a plastic keychain with an old 50s pinup photo, but it has been years since the box has received any mail.  When we first moved to Nicaragua my mother-in-law would send newspaper articles and birthday cards.  The boys would receive letters covered in hearts from girls at the school they were no longer attending in the states.  I would get postcards from friends travelling other far flung places with postmarks that went back weeks even months.  After a couple of years the mail stopped coming or just got more irregular.  We stopped checking for mail and we most likely neglected the rent on the box.  I should check for mail, maybe there’s something in there waiting to be picked up.  There is nothing better than a handwritten note, postmarked from a far-flung location with an exotic stamp!

Besos y Abrazos de Nicaragua,

Susan, Two Brothers Surf Resort

 

When my son was young and we first moved to Popoyo, he surfed a little local break called Paranoias were the young Nicas from the village would walk from town to Popoyo along the river bank. All of the kids were about ten to twelve and the only words they could manage to communicate were “grande olas” (big waves) and tiburon (shark!). They laughed a lot and snaked plenty of waves from each other. My son was having so much fun being included in their banter that he proudly announced one day that his new Nica buddies now called him a local… What they actually said was “el is loco”, which to his young gringo ears sounded to him like “he rips like a local!’